ted:

Happy Earth Day! The stunning photos above show the Sacred Headwaters, a pristine area of protected land in a remote corner of northern British Columbia. The area is about the size of the entire state of Oregon, and only one tiny road winds through it. (For context, on the US mainland, the farthest you can get from a maintained road is about 20 miles. Oregon is 98,466 square miles.)

Watch the full talk here »

If a polar bear could talk and tell us first-hand her story about the impending destruction in the Arctic, that purposeful polar bear would be Sara Aparício, as she so compelling explains in her new Arctic awareness video. Please check it out! VOTE! Look out for s.aparicio! She’s more than a polar mascot, she’s our ACCEL Arctic Ambassador.

RyanAir. Flight FR8081

From: Brussels (Charleroi), Belgium (CRL). Wed 12 - Feb 2014. 15:10

To: Fez, Morocco (FEZ). Wed 12 - Feb 2014. 17:15

Ponder Du Jour

Who would have thought that I would be going to Moroccan High Atlas Mountains to experience my first snow of the season. 

tohdaryl:

Happy Chinese New Year to my fellow friends and followers in Tumblr! May all of you be blessed with good health, wealth, and happiness in this Year of the Horse! 

新年快乐,马到成功!

tohdaryl:

Happy Chinese New Year to my fellow friends and followers in Tumblr! May all of you be blessed with good health, wealth, and happiness in this Year of the Horse! 

新年快乐,马到成功!

Ponder Du Jour

Consider a relevant but distinctly different area of specialisation if you’re thinking about pursuing a Master’s degree. Don’t let it be a review of your last two years of Bachelor’s. And if an undergraduate degree in your home country is sufficient enough to launch your career, you should be cautious of the standardised higher education system in Europe (Bologna Process). 

wilsoncenter:

Can China Solve its Water-Energy Choke Point?

Factories in China’s Pearl River Delta tick-tock around the clock, rapidly churning out gadgets from iPhones and Barbie dolls to forks and light bulbs, shipped off to village shops in Uganda and super Walmarts in America’s sprawling suburbs. But far from the global consumer’s view, manufacturing and rapid development are placing unrelenting pressure on China’s environment. 

This pressure is perhaps most visible when it comes to the confrontation between energy demand and water supply. Twenty percent of water withdrawn in China goes to coal mining, processing, and power plants, which supply 70 percent of China’s electricity. These plants keep the lights on and the factories running. On the other side of the supply chain, factories spew pollutants – ranging from dyes used for skinny jeans to paints for toy train sets – into main waterways. The contaminated water is either treated – a process which carries significant energy costs – or, as is too often the case, leaches underground and ends up in irrigation systems, the lifeline of the nation’s food supply.

At the same time, China is undergoing the greatest human migration in modern history.

By 2025 an estimated 350 million people – more than the entire U.S. population today – will be added to China’s urban areas. Water and energy are required inputs for the steel and cement needed by these new and growing cities, as well as the acquired tastes of new urbanites, such as air conditioners and meat-intensive diets, further driving demand.

The implications of this water-energy “choke point” are far-reaching.

More at New Security Beat.

I should work in China. But first I need on my Chinese. 

Ponder Du Jour

It would appear that the greater the number of references cited in a journal article, the greater its scientific heft and value. But doesn’t that just mean you don’t have much to add to the topic? Wouldn’t the real breakthrough discoveries depend on extraordinary talent and insight, and data collection and analysis devised completely from scratch?